top of page

Baumschule

Öffentlich·20 Mitglieder

Download the BS 5839-1 PDF for Free: The Best Practice for Fire Detection and Alarm Systems for Buildings


BS 5839-1:2017 - A Guide to Fire Detection and Fire Alarm Systems for Buildings




Fire detection and fire alarm systems are essential for protecting lives and properties from the devastating effects of fire. They can alert occupants, staff, emergency services and other relevant parties to the presence of a fire, as well as initiate other fire protection measures, such as activating sprinklers, closing doors or shutting down equipment.




bs 5839-1 pdf free download



However, not all fire detection and fire alarm systems are created equal. Depending on the type, size, use and risk profile of the building, different levels of fire protection may be required. Moreover, fire detection and fire alarm systems need to be designed, installed, commissioned and maintained in accordance with the best practices and standards to ensure their reliability, effectiveness and compliance.


One of the most widely recognized and respected standards for fire detection and fire alarm systems in the UK is BS 5839-1:2017. This standard provides a code of practice for designing, installing, commissioning and maintaining fire detection and fire alarm systems in non-domestic premises. It covers a wide range of buildings, such as offices, shops, hotels, schools, hospitals, care homes and more.


In this article, we will explain what BS 5839-1:2017 is, why it is important, what are the main changes compared to the previous version, and how to design, install, commission and maintain a fire detection and fire alarm system according to this standard.


What is BS 5839-1:2017 and why is it important?




The scope and purpose of BS 5839-1:2017




BS 5839-1:2017 is a British Standard published by the British Standards Institution (BSI). It contains recommendations for the locations of fire alarm system components based on the objective the system should fulfil, known as categories. It also provides a code of practice for designing, installing, commissioning and maintaining fire detection and fire alarm systems in non-domestic premises.


The term 'fire detection and fire alarm systems' in the context of this standard includes systems that range from those comprising only one or two manual call points and sounders to complex networked systems that incorporate a large number of automatic fire detectors, manual call points and sounders. It also includes systems that are capable of providing signals to initiate the operation of other fire protection systems or safety measures.


The standard does not cover systems whose primary function is to extinguish or control fire. It also does not cover voice alarm systems, systems combining fire alarm functions with non-fire related ones, audible or visual way-guidance systems designed to complement the fire alarm function, or public emergency call systems (999 or 112).


The legal and regulatory context of BS 5839-1:2017




BS 5839-1:2017 is not a legal requirement, but rather a code of practice that provides guidance and recommendations for achieving compliance with the relevant legislation and regulations. The main legal framework for fire safety in the UK is the Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005 in England and Wales, the Fire (Scotland) Act 2005 and the Fire Safety (Scotland) Regulations 2006 in Scotland, and the Fire and Rescue Services (Northern Ireland) Order 2006 and the Fire Safety Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2010 in Northern Ireland.


These regulations place a duty on the responsible person, such as the owner, employer, occupier or manager of a premises, to carry out a fire risk assessment and implement appropriate fire safety measures to protect the people and property in the premises. This may include the provision of a suitable and sufficient fire detection and fire alarm system, depending on the outcome of the risk assessment.


bs 5839-1 code of practice pdf free download


bs 5839-1 fire detection and alarm systems pdf free download


bs 5839-1 pocket guide pdf free download


bs 5839-1 2017 pdf free download


bs 5839-1 fire alarm design pdf free download


bs 5839-1 installation and commissioning pdf free download


bs 5839-1 maintenance and testing pdf free download


bs 5839-1 non-domestic premises pdf free download


bs 5839-1 voice alarm systems pdf free download


bs 5839-1 emergency voice communication pdf free download


bs 5839-1 expert commentary pdf free download


bs 5839-1 queries and interpretations pdf free download


bs 5839-1 fire risk assessment pdf free download


bs 5839-1 fire safety order pdf free download


bs 5839-1 apollo fire pdf free download


bs 5839 part 1 pdf free download


british standard bs 5839 part 1 pdf free download


bsi bs 5839 part 1 pdf free download


fire detection and alarm systems for buildings bs 5839 part 1 pdf free download


code of practice for system design installation commissioning and maintenance of systems in non-domestic premises bs 5839 part 1 pdf free download


specification for automatic release mechanisms for certain fire protection equipment bs 5839 part 3 pdf free download


code of practice for the design installation commissioning and maintenance of fire detection and fire alarm systems in domestic premises bs 5839 part 6 pdf free download


code of practice for the design installation commissioning and maintenance of voice alarm systems bs 5839 part 8 pdf free download


code of practice for the design installation commissioning and maintenance of emergency voice communication systems bs 5839 part 9 pdf free download


how to comply with bs 5839 part 1 pdf free download


what is bs 5839 part 1 pdf free download


why is bs 5839 part 1 important pdf free download


when to use bs 5839 part 1 pdf free download


where to buy bs 5839 part 1 pdf free download


who needs to follow bs 5839 part 1 pdf free download


By following BS 5839-1:2017, the responsible person can demonstrate that they have taken reasonable steps to comply with their legal obligations and reduce the risk of fire. However, BS 5839-1:2017 is not a substitute for a fire risk assessment, and it may not cover all aspects of fire safety that are relevant to a specific premises. Therefore, it is advisable to consult with a competent fire safety professional before designing, installing, commissioning or maintaining a fire detection and fire alarm system.


What are the main changes in BS 5839-1:2017 compared to the previous version?




BS 5839-1:2017 is the latest version of the standard, which was published in September 2017. It supersedes BS 5839-1:2013, which was published in August 2013. The main changes in BS 5839-1:2017 compared to the previous version are as follows:


Improved definition of the L2 fire alarm system




The L2 fire alarm system is one of the categories of fire detection and fire alarm systems defined by BS 5839-1:2017. It is intended to provide early warning of fire in areas of high risk or high fire hazard within a building. The previous version of the standard did not specify which areas should be covered by an L2 system, leaving it to the discretion of the designer or the responsible person.


The new version of the standard provides a clearer definition of the L2 system, stating that it should cover all areas that are defined as escape routes (such as corridors, stairways and exits) and all rooms or areas that open onto escape routes. This means that an L2 system should provide full coverage of all parts of a building that are likely to be used by occupants to escape from a fire.


Modified guidance for use of multi-sensor detectors




Multi-sensor detectors are devices that combine two or more types of sensors, such as smoke, heat or carbon monoxide sensors, to detect different characteristics of a fire. They can offer advantages over single-sensor detectors, such as improved performance, reduced false alarms and increased flexibility.


The previous version of the standard recommended that multi-sensor detectors should be treated as either smoke detectors or heat detectors, depending on which sensor was dominant. The new version of the standard recognizes that multi-sensor detectors can have different modes of operation and response depending on the type and combination of sensors. Therefore, it provides more detailed guidance on how to select, position and configure multi-sensor detectors according to their specific characteristics and functions.


Clarification on the use of voice alarm devices and visual indicator devices




Voice alarm devices are devices that broadcast pre-recorded or live voice messages to alert occupants of a fire or other emergency situation. Visual indicator devices are devices that emit flashing or steady lights to indicate the presence of a fire or other emergency situation. Both types of devices can be used to supplement or replace conventional sounders in certain situations.


The previous version of the standard did not provide clear guidance on when and how to use voice alarm devices and visual indicator devices in fire detection and fire alarm systems. The new version of the standard clarifies that voice alarm devices should be used when they can provide more effective communication than sounders, such as in large or complex buildings, buildings with high ambient noise levels, buildings with occupants who may not respond well to sounders, or buildings where sounders may cause panic or confusion.


The new version of the standard also clarifies that visual indicator devices should be used when they can provide more effective warning than sounders, such as in buildings with occupants who are deaf or hard-of-hearing, buildings with high ambient noise levels, buildings where sounders may be masked by other sounds, or buildings where sounders may cause interference with other systems.


Inclusion of a section on testing of the power supply




The power supply is a vital component of any fire detection and fire alarm system, as it provides the necessary electrical energy to operate the system. The power supply can consist of mains electricity, batteries, generators or a combination of these sources. The power supply should be designed and installed to ensure that the system can function normally and reliably under normal and fault conditions.


The previous version of the standard did not include a specific section on testing of the power supply, although it did mention some general requirements for testing and inspection of the system. The new version of the standard includes a dedicated section on testing of the power supply, which specifies the frequency, methods and criteria for testing the different types of power sources and their components. It also provides guidance on how to record and report the results of the testing.


Guidance for persons who work at night to recognize the alarm




Some buildings may have persons who work at night, such as cleaners, security guards, maintenance workers or night shift workers. These persons may not be familiar with the fire detection and fire alarm system or its operation, and they may not be able to hear or see the alarm signals due to their location, activity or personal protective equipment.


The previous version of the standard did not provide any specific guidance for persons who work at night to recognize the alarm. The new version of the standard provides some recommendations for ensuring that persons who work at night are aware of the fire detection and fire alarm system and its signals, such as providing them with training, information, instructions or portable devices that can alert them to the alarm.


How to design, install, commission and maintain a fire detection and fire alarm system according to BS 5839-1:2017?




The role and responsibilities of the designer




The designer is the person or organization who is responsible for designing the fire detection and fire alarm system in accordance with BS 5839-1:2017 and the relevant legislation and regulations. The designer should have adequate knowledge, skills and experience in fire safety engineering and fire detection and fire alarm systems. The designer should also consult with the responsible person, the enforcing authority, the fire service, the insurer and other relevant parties to ensure that the system meets their requirements and expectations.


The designer should carry out a detailed survey of the premises, including its layout, structure, occupancy, use, fire hazards, fire protection measures and existing fire detection and fire alarm system if any. The designer should also conduct a thorough analysis of the fire risk assessment and identify the objectives and categories of the system. Based on these information, the designer should prepare a design specification that defines the scope, performance, functionality and configuration of the system.


The designer should also prepare a design drawing that shows the locations and types of all components of the system, such as detectors, call points, sounders, control panels, wiring and cabling. The design drawing should be clear, accurate and up-to-date. The designer should also provide a design certificate that confirms that the system has been designed in accordance with BS 5839-1:2017 and other relevant standards.


The categories of fire detection and fire alarm systems




BS 5839-1:2017 defines two types of categories for fire detection and fire alarm systems: property protection categories (P) and life protection categories (L). Property protection categories are intended to protect the building and its contents from fire damage. Life protection categories are intended to protect the occupants and users of the building from fire hazards. The categories are further divided into subcategories based on the level of protection and the areas covered by the system.


The table below summarizes the main categories and subcategories of fire detection and fire alarm systems according to BS 5839-1:2017.



Category


Subcategory


Description


P


P1


A system that provides full coverage of the building, including all rooms, spaces and voids, except for those that are deemed to be of no or negligible fire risk.


P2


A system that provides partial coverage of the building, covering only those areas that are defined as high fire risk or high fire hazard.


L


L1


A system that provides full coverage of the building, including all rooms, spaces and voids, except for those that are deemed to be of no or negligible fire risk.


L2


A system that covers all areas that are defined as escape routes (such as corridors, stairways and exits) and all rooms or areas that open onto escape routes.


L3


A system that covers all areas that are defined as escape routes (such as corridors, stairways and exits) and adjacent rooms that present a high fire risk to the escape routes.


L4


A system that covers only those areas that are defined as escape routes (such as corridors, stairways and exits).


L5


A system that covers only those areas that are specified by a fire risk assessment or other relevant authority, such as areas where fire may pose a particular risk to life or property.


M


A system that comprises only manual call points and sounders, without any automatic fire detectors.



The choice of the category and subcategory of the system depends on the objectives and requirements of the system, which should be determined by a fire risk assessment and consultation with the relevant parties. The category and subcategory of the system should be clearly stated in the design specification and the design drawing.


The selection and positioning of fire detectors and manual call points




Fire detectors are devices that sense one or more characteristics of a fire, such as smoke, heat or flame, and generate a signal to activate the fire alarm. Manual call points are devices that allow occupants to manually raise the alarm by breaking a glass or pressing a button. Both types of devices are essential for detecting and reporting a fire in a timely manner.


The selection and positioning of fire detectors and manual call points should be based on the category and subcategory of the system, the type and layout of the building, the nature and distribution of the fire hazards, the environmental conditions and other factors that may affect their performance. The designer should follow the recommendations and guidance provided by BS 5839-1:2017, as well as the manufacturer's instructions and specifications for each device.


Some general principles for selecting and positioning fire detectors and manual call points are:



  • Fire detectors should be chosen according to their suitability for detecting different types of fires, such as smouldering, flaming or rapid growth fires. For example, smoke detectors are more suitable for detecting smouldering fires than heat detectors, while heat detectors are more suitable for detecting flaming fires than smoke detectors.



  • Fire detectors should be positioned to ensure adequate coverage of the area to be protected, taking into account the size, shape, height and configuration of the area. For example, smoke detectors should be spaced at no more than 10.6 m apart in a square pattern or 7.5 m apart in a rectangular pattern, while heat detectors should be spaced at no more than 5.3 m apart in a square pattern or 3.7 m apart in a rectangular pattern.



  • Fire detectors should be positioned to avoid obstructions, interference or adverse environmental conditions that may affect their operation or cause false alarms. For example, smoke detectors should not be located near ventilation outlets, air conditioning units, cooking appliances or sources of steam or dust, while heat detectors should not be located near windows, skylights, heaters or sources of cold air.



  • Manual call points should be located on every storey of the building, at every exit from the building or storey, at every exit from an area covered by an automatic fire detection system, and at every change of direction along an escape route. They should also be located within easy reach of occupants, preferably at a height of 1.4 m from the floor, and clearly visible and accessible. They should also be marked with appropriate signs and instructions.



The selection and positioning of fire alarm sounders and visual alarms




Fire alarm sounders are devices that produce audible signals, such as bells, sirens, horns or voice messages, to alert occupants of a fire or other emergency situation. Visual alarms are devices that produce visible signals, such as flashing or steady lights, to indicate the presence of a fire or other emergency situation. Both types of devices are essential for communicating and warning occupants of a fire.


The selection and positioning of fire alarm sounders and visual alarms should be based on the category and subcategory of the system, the type and layout of the building, the nature and distribution of the occupants, the ambient noise levels and other factors that may affect their performance. The designer should follow the recommendations and guidance provided by BS 5839-1:2017, as well as the manufacturer's instructions and specifications for each device.


Some general pri


Info

Willkommen in der Gruppe! Sie können sich mit anderen Mitgli...
bottom of page